Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 2003: Jason Isaacs in Peter Pan

Jason Isaacs did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Mr. Darling/Captain Hook in Peter Pan.

Peter Pan is a very much forgotten though more than decent big budget and fairly straight forward telling of Peter Pan.

Jason Isaacs as fitting to the tradition of the stage production plays both the role of Mr. Darling and Captain Hook. Isaacs seems like someone who ought to have played Captain Hook sometime in his career, but Mr. Darling presents his side shown far less often. Now we are not given too much time with Mr. Darling though Isaacs does manage to make a nice impression in them, in his approach which differs quite strongly from say the Disney version of the character. In that version we have shades of Hook in Mr. Darling before we see Neverland that's not the case for Isaacs. Isaacs plays Mr. Darling as very much a man of Edwardian England, very proper, very meek but with this undeniable earnestness. In his brief moment where we see his frustrations build towards his children, Isaacs actually successfully creates a sympathy, even when being rather humorous, by showing how desperately Mr. Darling wants to impress his employers. Unfortunately the children lead to an embarrassment where Mr. Darling lashes out. Isaacs effectively handles the scene by portraying the frustration as a burst of sudden emotion, that is not purely cruel rather something far more genuine to a man who otherwise loves children.

Of course what we are really waiting for is Isaacs as Captain Hook, which seems perfect casting given Isaacs's perchance for playing evil Englishman. Isaacs though does not merely reprise his Colonel Tavington, which would be far too dark, nor is he even his Lucius Malfoy which would not be quite right for this children's story. Yes the menace is of course there, Isaacs seems to be overjoyed just to be evil at times which comes through. That menace almost seems to be an innate thing and it is merely a given that he fulfills Hook's role as the big bad pirate, but now he goes so much further than that here. Hook is not just any bad guy really there is something more to be had within his various facets, succeeding in those other facets is the true requite for a great Captain Hook. Isaacs sort of having the menace as a given is a great aid as he pivots this to being more than that. In that he brings this certain style of the grand Pirate Captain fitting to the fantastical setting of Neverland. There's this exuberance he brings in his performance, a grandeur of it that has just the right sort of theatrical bent. His Hook isn't just going to kill Peter Pan in his view, he's going to do in a proper flamboyant style.

Isaacs understands the certain pageantry if you will that goes along with the part, which never compromises the needed menace though. He offers both in a properly intimidating though also incredibly entertaining performance. His Hook has the right sense of mischievousness within the more direct villainy. He never allows his Hook to be defined as only the evil pirate, and has so much of the right sort of fun in the role. I have an especially strong affection for portraying the downtrodden, and falsely empathetic Hook who manages to trick Tinkerbell into helping him. Isaacs is properly amusing in his so falsely, yet appropriately earnest delivery of Hook's concern for Peter Pan. Isaacs finds that right balance in his performance in being the villain but doing it in such an enjoyable fashion. This of course also comes heavily into play in Hook's fear of the crocodile who took his Hook. Although this is not given as much focus as the Disney version, Isaacs still is quite funny in portraying the gripping fear in Hook every moment he believes the crocodile is nearby. Isaacs's Hook steals the film with ease, though I will say that is a fairly common occurrence when it comes to Peter Pan. Isaacs is a great Hook though as he balances the part so well to be such almost oddly endearing fiend for the film. Although it is also worth noting his final return as Mr. Darling where Isaacs is actually rather moving in so honestly portraying Mr. Darling's heartfelt apology for his children. His change of heart is entirely earned, since again even before his lashing out Isaacs's reactions were always that of a caring father. Isaacs excels in both roles being a properly sweet Mr. Darling, and a Captain Hook that captures just about all that the great Captain should be.

83 comments:

Anonymous said...

Luke Higham

Louis: I'm so pleased, you really liked him here. :)

Thoughts on the rest of the cast.

Anonymous said...

And further thoughts on the film and the score.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on John DiMaggio's Bender.

Calvin Law said...

In Season 2 of Breaking Bad now, and though Cranston and Paul are every bit as incredible as advertised, the major delights have been performances I haven't heard all that much about on the awards scene. I'm loving Dean Norris now (and he should really get a plum Hollywood role soon enough), Hank is probably my favourite character. And Mark Margolis is quite something.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Could Isaacs go up for The Patriot.

omar said...

Darkest Hour trailer is out, i think the Academy will go big on this like they did with Lincoln.

Louis: Thoughs on the trailer? And what are your expectations on the movie?

Calvin Law said...

I'm slightly worried about Mendelsohn actually, I hope that lisp won't become distracting (although it's supposedly accurate).

Oldman looks fantastic though.

Anonymous said...

Its likely that Mendelsohn will get an Oscar nomination for this, he seems like the person they will push rather than Hurt, which I actually think is the correct decision.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Hurt never got to shoot his scenes unfortunately.

Luke Higham said...

And even though I'm a fan of Mendelsohn, there's no way he'll come anywhere close to Jared Harris' portrayal in The Crown.

Luke Higham said...

BTW, I saw Cox's portrayal of Churchill earlier this week and even though the film wasn't particularly memorable, I greatly enjoyed his presence.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Mendelsohn always has a lisp, though.

omar said...

Kristin Scott Thomas could get nominated this year, she has the supporting wife role and I thought she was good in the few scenes in the trailer, and this year supporting actress category looks thin compared to the other acting categories.

Calvin Law said...

Robert: Now that you mention it, yes he does particularly when he uses his Aussie accent. It's just a little less noticeable when he's doing American accents which is the majority of stuff I've seen him in. And to be honest, when actors give a good performance I tend not to notice these things. Technically speaking, Michael Keaton has one as well but it does kind of add to his performances.

Calvin Law said...

You know what, I take back what I said, I feel bad for pointing out something as a conscious acting choice when it might just be something in an actor's customary approach that I hadn't picked up on.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Oh dear lord, the snubbed McKean and Winstead at the Emmys.

Calvin Law said...

Jeffrey Wright getting in for my favourite performance of the 2010s makes me very glad. But shame to hear they've snubbed a few worthy ones again.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I knew they would shut out Legion, but Plaza's snub is unforgivable.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Also, Thewlis getting in over Stuhlbarg is a hate crime.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Winstead should have been nominated. I really liked Dern, Woodley, Davis and Hoffmann, but Winstead was actually better than all of them.

Luke Higham said...

They didn't nominate Harris for Guest Actor, fuck this. :(

Charles Heiston said...

Some idiotic snubs as per usual.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: Television Award shows are always shit to me. I hate the BAFTAs just as much.

Charles Heiston said...

Luke: I agree.

Alex Marqués said...

While I was expecting it, MEW snub is still awful. A classic example of favoring a more famous actor from the same show instead of the more impressive one. That being said, Westworld's acting noms make me happy.

Michael Patison said...

The Harris snub is atrocious, but on the bright side, Riz Ahmed got two.

Michael McCarthy said...

Anyone else seeing Planet of the Apes tonight?

Luke Higham said...

Michael: I'm seeing it tomorrow. I'm absolutely pumped up for it. Perhaps Serkis could finally get a 4.5 or higher 3rd time around.

Luke Higham said...

Michael: Could you give your initial thoughts later on.

94dfk1 said...

Michael: I most likely will see it tonight. Will give thoughts later if I do.

Michael McCarthy said...

I've tended to love these movies more than most people do, so don't be surprised if I'm over-enthusiastic right after I see it.

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to the Emmys I can't complain too much. No Seehorn, Plaza (though I did not expect them to go for a comic book series in any "major" category), McKean and Winstead do sting though. McKean unfortunately suffering under the preference for familiarity, despite being far more impressive than Banks this season, though Banks was still good. I would have also liked to have seen Ray Wise and Louis Herthum in guest actor, but since I haven't seen any of the actual nominees I can't really complain. I was overjoyed by many of the inclusions though including David Thewlis, David Harbour, Millie Bobbie Brown, and everyone who got in from the Night Of and Westworld especially Jeffrey Wright.

Luke:

Sumpter - 2.5(Ah yes the eternal struggle. I think Pan might be one of the hardest parts to pull off since a boy coming off so confident does become pretty intolerable pretty quickly to the point that Hook somehow is far more likable. Sumpter does not overcome this either as his attempts at charm come off as a smugness, though he does try and is far more tolerable than say the Animated Peter. His performance though does work best in his more vulnerable scenes, where he does succeed actually particularly in Tink's death scene.)

Wood - 3(She brings a nice charm and well sort of the needed "spunk" to her Wendy. She plays well with this certain maturing within the wonderment of it all as she portrays sort of Wendy growing up well also going on this adventure.)

Briers - 3(A standard but effective Smee. Doesn't go too far, I probably preferred Hoskins really, but he's good.)

Williams - 2.5(She's there and perfectly fine, but never really does much.)

Redgrave - 3(She's quite good in her early scene as she does not make her character's reaction a villainous one portraying a warmth in her encouragement towards maturity actually. She's also rather effective in portraying sort of the breakdown of her properness in her earnest display of emotion at the end.)

Anonymous:

The film itself works purely as a presentation of a nice wheel, it is not a reinvention but just the wheel itself sometimes works. The film certainly carries the right whimsy, and fun to Neverland as well as the story. It does not get solely caught up in that though and captures the spirit of the story as well through the bookends. I wouldn't call it the definite Peter Pan film, I don't think we've truly gotten that yet, but it's a good one.

Although this is the better film I think I probably preferred John Williams's scoring of Hook than Howard's scoring of this film. Howard goes for a similair approach and I will say succeeds in finding that whimsy though in general sort of way.

Anonymous:

DiMaggio's performance I will say had a certain halflife as his early work was the best as he had a comedic yet rather sinister underlying bent. He managed to be endearing though with the scheming in the evil. He began to lose it a bit though when the character became whiny, and just couldn't adjust to making that work.

Anonymous:

Maybe.

Omar:

I did rather like the urgency of the trailer to the point it almost plays like a companion to Dunkirk. Nevertheless I think the film could still go either way, and my concerns stand regarding the writer. Mendelsohn looks promising, looks like some primo Dillane, I will wait for context to pass any judgement on Oldman since they were clearly playing mostly to what are imagine are the most heightened scenes, and though it is very sad Hurt did not get to shoot his scenes they apparently just got Neville Chamberlain himself instead. For me there were no obvious red flags, the cast is there, but again the creative team behind the scenes leaves a big question mark.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Who would be ideal candidates to play Mr. Darling/Captain Hook in a future adaptation.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: A big issue I have with Peter Pan and to a minor extent, Spielberg's Hook is that they casted an American as Pan, when he originated from Kensington.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Benedict Cumberbatch
Sharlto Copley
James D'Arcy
Ben Mendelsohn

Now that you mention it, that is rather strange.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Who would you've cast instead of Williams in Hook. And it has to be a Brit by the way. :)

Calvin Law said...

Louis: what about David Thewlis? I reckon he could be quite a fun Hook too (bit too old though mayb).

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Well Williams wasn't really the problem with Hook, other than the treehouse shtick scene, however to answer your question Cary Elwes.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Yes I could see it, but it would have had to have been really for this film.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Toby Jones as Smee?

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

No other choice, though if Cumberbatch were Hook, I don't think they could resist putting Martin Freeman in the role.

Robert MacFarlane said...

How about Chiwetel Ejiofor as Captain Hook?

Luke Higham said...

As a Caribbean Hook, Ejiofor would be interesting.

Michael McCarthy said...

Just got out of War of the Planet of the Apes. Overall I enjoyed the hell out of it, and on every technical level (other than the lighting which is often just a little dimmer than it needs to be) it's excellent. The highlights in this regard are the breathtaking production design of the Colonel's stronghold and of course the once again unbeatable motion capture. From a storytelling perspective it's just as strong as ever, and it was a smart choice to keep the focus squarely on Caesar's story, as opposed to the first two films which both had human pseudo-leads. Admittedly the film is a bit slow to start, as the central conflict requires quite some time to set up. In addition, some of the emotional moments early on aren't given quite as much time to sink in as I would've liked, but Serkis makes up for these with his genuine reactions to what happens around him, in what is definitely his most interesting character arc yet. The supporting cast is solid all around, with highlights being Harrelson as the only compelling human character in the whole trilogy and Steve Zahn actually being so much more than just the comic relief. It all amounts to a very smart, exciting and intriguingly topical "end" to the franchise that goes out on a rather moving note.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

As for the Emmys, I love the Westworld, and the Stranger Things nominations. I do find it rather confusing that Thomas Middleditch was snubbed for Silicon Valley, and as always, the lack of love for its supporting actors is disappointing.

94dfk1 said...

War for the Planet of the Apes is a terrific conclusion to this trilogy. Great action and dramatic scenes.

Serkis-5
Harrelson-4.5
Chavarria-3
Zahn-4
Kohnoval-4

Matt Mustin said...

Louis, what's your thoughts on "Things Have Changed" from Wonder Boys?

Calvin Law said...

Liked War for the Planet of the Apes, though I think it's just about on par with Dawn. I'll admit I kind of missed having Koba as an adversary, though Harrelson was certainly an effective villain. As Michael says, it does start off a bit slow, certainly an atmospheric sort of slow-burn, but not quite on par with say, Logan. The highlight of the film is most certainly the motion capture, the production design is pretty great. The whole progression of the film felt a bit like Rogue One to me as it hit its high point towards the end, and it certainly has a very immersive climax.

Serkis - Need to ruminate a bit more
Harrelson - 4.5
Zahn - 4
Konoval - 3.5
Notary, Olsson, Adamthwaite - 3
Miller - 3.5

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your thoughts on Raymond Cruz, and Matt L. Jones on Breaking Bad? And who would you choose for Walter White and Jesse Pinkman in a 1970s Breaking Bad. I have an idea for a 1960s British one with Michael Redgrave as Walt and Tom Courtenay as Jesse.

Calvin Law said...

And also your th9ughts on the episodes 'Grilled' and 'Peekaboo'.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Breaking Bad's '4 Days Out' and 'Salud' episodes.

Michael McCarthy said...

I guess I'll post my ratings for the cast now.

Serkis: 4.5
Harrelson: 4.5
Zahn: 4 (could go higher as I thought there was something very interesting he did with this role)
Konoval: 3.5 (gets a slight edge over Olson and Notary due to one reaction towards the end that comes through the mo-cap beautifully)
Notary & Olsson: 3
Miller: 3

Luke Higham said...

Hope we get 1957 after this. Aside from La Strada and Sansho The Bailiff, 1954 doesn't interest me at all.

Luke Higham said...

Was gonna watch WOTPOTA earlier but the last screening was in 3D.

Louis Morgan said...

Also saw War For the Planet of the Apes, which despite a little bit of a lull once they get to the base, I thought was pretty great, and The Big Sick, which I liked, though I suppose I felt it was a notch below the general consensus.

Matt:

Perhaps I wouldn't quite put up there with vintage Dylan but it stands well as a song on its own. As typically Dylan, the lyrics are certainly never ignored yet as per usual he weaves them through what stands as quite the entertaining melody, though I'd say I have the most affection for his chorus breaks that really work, where the verses do get lost just a tad after awhile.

Calvin:

Cruz - (His performance is ridiculous, but properly so. He effectively makes Tuco pure Id that there is no real reasoning with and he works as this more or less this thing that it is best to avoid. He creates the right menace in the mere unpredictability of his performance as he so effectively shows the way the man goes from whatever emotion he chooses at feeling at any given time. He's the right sort of pure mad dog. Cruz's work makes it so you don't know what quite to expect from him at any given time either, and properly puts you right there with Walter and Jesse as they try to figure him out.)

Jones - (Badger and Skinny Pete for that matter are some of the best comedy relief for any show, and really they only get better. Just wait until the Chekov's eating contest. Anyway Jones's comedic timing of the never quite serious enough and certainly never smart enough Badger is almost assured for some hilariousness whenever he appears. Jones brings just the right type of vapidness to everything, an earnest vapidness though that manages to make him rather endearing even in his gross incompetence.)

Grilled - (An amazing climax to season 1, even if it happens to be in season 2. Grilled though creates such a considerable tension that does not let go until the hydraulics finally stop working in Jesse's car. It's so masterfully done in building it up at each moment part in due to Cruz's performance, and one of the most unnerving uses of a bell you'll see in a show. It works so well though as you kind of try to think as Walter and Jesse do in coming up with a way to get out of there alive, up until that final twisty arrival.)

Peekaboo - (A great episode with Paul's performance being the highlight, though also a very unnerving performance by Dale Dickey. I love these episodes in the series though as they are a blunt reminder to the true nature of the sort of work Walt and Jesse are in. It also is a great example though of the show that moves at such a good pace, still has the right time for these very personal episodes. This one particularly effective in its showing of the real underbelly of the underbelly of the drug trade, along with showing Jesse's attempt to be tough drug dealer while the real humanity of the character keeps shining through.)

Jack Lemmon for Walter, and James Woods as Jesse.

Tahmeed:

4 Days Out - (Again like Peekaboo this is such a great episode since it just takes the time with Walt and Jesse, to just have that time where they interact where we learn so much about each and their relationship. Beautiful work from both but both are excellent. They excel in the dramatic moments of course, as Walt's reveals his concerns, but I also love how naturally they bring humor in such as Paul's flawless delivery of "wire")

Salud - (Ah an amazing episode that always seems a little strange since you end up so sympathizing and rooting for a chief villain, against another villain. This episode so expertly realizes this take down, with such style, but such character amplified again by the great performances this time by Banks, Paul and especially Esposito. Of course that is always forgetting that the show does not waste scenes. Though the cartel scene is the highlight, the Skyler/Saul IRS plan is a rather comical continuation of that story, and Walter's recovery scene is a rather poignant one showing him at his most vulnerable.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the films and the casts.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And your top ten trilogies.

Calvin Law said...

Apes is sitting quite well with me. I'd need a rewatch to be certain, but I like it the more I think about it.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Rorschach's death scene.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I saw War. I... have some reservations, but I need time to sit on it. It's not as good as Dawn.

Louis Morgan said...

War for the Planet Apes marks this as the most consistent film trilogy that is not made up of a consistent linear narrative like LOTR. Although for me part of that is they never quite achieved an overwhelming greatness yet have been good every time. That time is here again. A film not without flaws, I did not love the introduction of an element of the original films, did not care for the Alien 3ing of a certain character, lighting was a little off at times, the villain I feel could have been a bit better utilized, I did not feel the film needed to fall into Ten Commandments with Ceasar as Moses, I also feel the stakes at the end felt just somewhat muddled in terms of the other humans at the end. Having said that the CGI once again was incredible, though the lighting was not perfect some of the framing was rather impressive, but most importantly the investment and emotional stakes were once again there due to Ceasar's personal story which absolutely worked.

Saving Serkis.

Harrelson - 4(I guess I'm lowest on him mostly because I felt they underused him a bit. In that he really has this great buildup, and the idea that he is some demigod is established yet not utilized. Even with the chanting he ends up being oddly a mostly muted character, rather than say the Colonel Killgore, or Kurtz the early descriptions indicated. He's too often just there. Having said that he excels when he has the chance particularly in his explanation of his motivation scene. Harrelson brings the expected bravado but with a genuine pathos that offers some understanding to his villainy. I actually kind of felt Harrelson wanted to go further with the character than he was allowed, but he still does make the most of the moments he does have.)

Zahn - 4(A welcome source of non-intensity in the film, though I actually wouldn't have minded more of his character and less of the slave-apes story line. Zahn though is very effective in that he finds this sort of alternate delivery and behavior for his character, setting himself apart as an Ape who is not like the rest of them. Zahn finds the right type of daffiness for his delivery and expressions that represents both the mind of someone quite out of his place, but also changed through his isolation. He finds both the right fear and enthusiasm of the new experiences that standout well among all the spectacle in the third act.)

Konoval - 3.5(Again offering the same dignified gravitas to the role that goes even further here capitalizing on the previous films really in quite the poignant fashion.)

Miller - 3(I do feel there was something missing in regards to the plot element involving her, but I'll get more on that later. I did like her performance, though technically for reasons that conflict a bit with what the element should have been.)

Louis Morgan said...

The Big Sick, though not directed by Judd Apatow, has that certain tone to it that I just am not a fan of. However that was not this film all time, and whenever it completely got away from that certain overly cutesy knowing attitude I rather liked it. I will say there is another problem that I will get to in a moment, but overall I found it to be sometimes moving, sometimes insightful, sometimes funny look at what ends up being a rather atypical relationship.

Nanjiani - 3(Well here is a problem. I like Nanjiani quite a bit on Silicon Valley but I never felt as though he excelled in his more dramatic scenes. Well that's kind of the problem here as well. In that his performance does work well in the casual moments of the film, whether they be awkward interactions or humorous asides. He is also good in his romantic scenes. The most dramatic moments though are not his strong suit, he's not terrible but there's obviously some room for improvement.)

Kazan - 3(For reasons related to the plot she's not in it all that much do to that. She does make the right impression in her scenes in that she strikes up the right chemistry with Nanjiani in that time. The chemistry in creating a believable mutual affection as well as the seeds of conflict.)

Hunter - 4.5(Hunter though is pretty great here since she takes a role that very easily could have fallen into caricature in the wrong hands. Hunter of course does not allow that to happen always finding the truth, and even the humor in her character's sometimes extreme actions. She finds the underlying grief her intensity, but also she finds the loving warmth in that grief as well. It's lovely work that was easily the highlight of the film for me.)

Romano - 4(Proves himself quite capable here as a sorta dramatic actor actually. In that Romano finds the right natural humor in the situations and never forces them at any point. In addition he's pretty terrific in creating the history with Hunter in creating that given love, but also finds the pain of the years in their adversarial scenes. Past that though he also has very good chemistry with Nanjiani as the two strike up the right endearing camaraderie in their scenes together.)

Kher & Shroff - 3(Despite having many scenes the majority of them are played for laughs. They are funny in portraying their exact and obviously difficult ways of dealing with their son's Americanization, but that side of the story I always felt was tad thin at times.)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I take that earlier comment back Toy Story is more consistent. Any who no thematic trilogies.

1. Lord of the Rings
2. The Human Condition
3. Back to the Future
4. The Godfather
5. Toy Story
6. The Dark Knight
7. Indiana Jones
8. Star Wars
9. The Apes
10. Spider-Man

Anonymous:

In terms of acting the scene is very much on point. Haley is heartbreaking in that moment. I also will say the set up involving Night Owl, is kind of a trade off. On one end I think the isolated incident makes his demise all the sadder in the comic, but Night Owl and Silk Spectre going "hey millions of people are dead let's bang" is not the strongest point of the comic. It's a better scene in the film, but I do feel perhaps more powerful rendition was possible directing wise.

Calvin Law said...

Harrelson wasn't as great as I thought he'd be and yes, I'd probably bump him down to a 4. Serkis is really growing on me though.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Are you saving Nakadai for '61 or could I have thoughts on him now.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Saving.

Michael McCarthy said...

The reason I rate Harrelson as highly as I do is because he allowed himself to just make the character mentally past the point of no return, which provided an element to the human side of the story that the franchise has been sorely missing. I also appreciate that he didn't go over the top in portraying the Colonel's "change."

Calvin Law said...

Louis and co: this probably seems obvious, but don't Aaron Paul and Ben Foster seem like they should play brothers or something soon?

Michael McCarthy said...

Calvin: About 10 years ago they probably would've been perfect for an East of Eden remake.

94dfk1 said...

Calvin: Can't believe I barely noticed that until now. I think they should haha.

Also, I think it goes without saying that Ben Foster might've played Donald Pierce in Logan if he wasn't already part of the X-Men Universe.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Are you going to rewatch The Return of the King for Astin, or is he a guaranteed upgrade at this point.

Calvin Law said...

94dfk1 and Michael: those are all great ideas.

So Louis, I just watched The Handmaiden and I wonder, how on earth did it not get nominated for Best Production Design? I loved it overall (would probably be my #4 for 2016), and I'd go much higher on Kim Min-hee.

John Smith said...

Will Poulter is going to be amazing in 'Detroit'.

John Smith said...

(I'm varun Neermul. Using my John smith account.)

Calvin Law said...

Louis: what do you think of an 80s Breaking Bad with Gene Wilder as Walt and Robert Downey Jr. as Jesse.

Charles Heiston said...

Calvin: I think Paul & Foster would be perfect to play brothers. Would've been interesting to see Paul in Pine's role last year.

94dfk1 said...

Louis: Your Steve Trevor and "Sir Patrick Morgan" choices for a 90s and 00s Wonder Woman? I'm thinking Brad Pitt for the 90s but I don't know who'd be cast for the latter.

Luke Higham said...

War For The Planet Of The Apes
Serkis - 5 (His Best Work)
Harrelson - 4 (A compelling performance though I wish he had a bit more time)
Zahn - 4
Konoval - 3.5
Miller - 3
Despite it's rather misleading title, it's a strong conclusion to the rebooted Apes trilogy.

Luke Higham said...

In terms of action, Dawn was more memorable to me.

Michael McCarthy said...

I will admit that Dawn has the more impressive action directing. That POV tracking shot from the tank still blows me away.

Luke Higham said...

*Despite its rather misleading title.

Anonymous said...

Watched War for Planet of the Apes. I liked it, good conclusion to the trilogy.
Ratings:
Serkis: 5
Harrelson: 4/4,5
Zahn: 4
Konoval: 3,5
Notary, Olsson and Adamthwaite: 3
Miller: 3,5

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Yes they should.

Unfortunately The Handmaiden was apparently purposefully sabotaged by the South Korean government.

Great choices.

Tahmeed:

I don't need much of an excuse to re-watch Return of the King to begin with.

94dk1:

Val Kilmer 90's and Matt Damon 00's for Trevor.
Terence Stamp 90's and Liam Neeson 00's for Sir Charles